Tag Archives: Civil Rights

7 Children’s Books that Talk About Race

It can be difficult to talk to children about tough topics. From bullying and prejudice, to discrimination and racism, children’s books have helped to facilitate these difficult conversations in an accessible and meaningful way. Below we’ve compiled  seven of our many books that will help children come away with a better understanding of these complex issues and the world around them.

Don’t forget to round out your collection with our list of 10 diverse picture books that are not about oppression!

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Martin Luther King, Jr. and Other Civil Rights Activists To Celebrate

mlk jrNext Monday is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, which celebrates the the life and legacy of Dr. King. We commemorate the timeless values he taught us through his example — courage, truth, justice, compassion, dignity, humility and service that defined his character and empowered his leadership. In this day and age, it’s more important than ever to work together toward a great world, one filled with kindness and community. Each person can do their part, no matter how small, to make sure that our generation and future generations can triumph over poverty, racism, war, and violence. Below are civil rights activists whose work was (and continues to be) inspired by Dr. King, as well as other activists who have fought to make sure people, no matter what their background, be treated with the compassion and respect. Continue reading

Democracy in Action Book List

Election Day is just around the corner, meaning now is the time to let your voice be heard! We wanted to share these five titles that demonstrate everyday citizens of the United States taking action to create change for the better in their societies, showing that you can make a difference for people now and for future generations to come.

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Why You Should See Selma

In celebration of MLK Day today, we wanted to share two perspectives from Lee & Low staff members on why you should see Selma, the new movie based on the life of Martin Luther King, Jr. Much has been said about the lack of Academy Award nominations for the movie, but nevertheless moviegoers are uniformly in agreement that Selma is one of the best movies of the year. It offers a meaningful historical context for current events and a springboard for deep discussion, making it a valuable learning experience as well as a straight-up great movie.

Here’s why we think seeing Selma is one of the best ways you could spend MLK Day: Continue reading

Integrating Common Core Standards: Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening in Grades 2-3

Katherine Aliguest bloggerKatherine Ali is a dual-certified elementary and special education teacher. She recently graduated as a literacy specialist with a Masters in Science from Manhattanville College. She has experience teaching internationally in northern China and now teaches in the Bronx, NY.

In order to be active participants in the literate world, students must be reading, writing, speaking, and listening at all ages. The natural interplay of language looks slightly differently across grades levels, but the foundations and mission are the same:

Reading:  Text Complexity and the growth of comprehension

We want our students to ascend the staircase of text complexity and simultaneously sharpen their comprehension skills.  Students, of all ages, need to build stamina through independently reading more rigorous and complex texts.  Additionally, read-alouds allow students to access content and concepts they may not be able to decode themselves.

Writing: Text types, responding to reading, and research

Opinion pieces, research-based projects, and narratives are the three main categories of student writing the Common Core State Standards focus on.  It is also imperative that our students engage in the writing process and expand their writing style using the conventions of the English language.

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Voices from the Civil Rights Movement: Interview With Moses Teel Jr.

guest blogger iconAs Fast As Words Could Fly tells the story of Mason, a teenager growing up in North Carolina who becomes one of the first black students to attend an all-white high school. In this guest post, we interview author Pamela M. Tuck’s father, Moses Teel Jr., whose experience during integration inspired the New Voices award-winning title.

Moses Teel Jr. around the same age as Mason in As Fast As Words Could Fly Moses Teel Jr. around the same age as Mason in As Fast As Words Could Fly
Moses Teel Jr. around the same age as Mason in As Fast As Words Could Fly

Lee & Low: In the Author’s Note, it says that you used your “typing talent to defy the prejudices of people who considered [you] inferior.” Did you also participate in a typing contest similar to the one Mason was in? What was that experience like?

Moses Teel Jr.: Yes. In my typing class, we had five-minute timed typing exercises. Five strokes counted for one word and every error took one word away from your total word count. I participated in a lot of these classroom competitions and won. That’s what helped me qualify for the tournament. By the time I had to compete, I felt pretty confident in my skill and I stayed focused by telling myself, “I can do this.”

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How was Martin Luther King, Jr. Day established?

picture of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

The strides that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made during the Civil Rights Movement continues to be remembered and honored today, but did you know it actually took 15 years for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day to be created?

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A Lunch at the Museum

The odd and the beautiful are photos taken from the streets of New York City, our commutes, and our travels. Sometimes humorous, often times unusual, they offer a taste of life in the big city and beyond.

Audience Participation

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