Tag Archives: close reading

Reading Sight Words Automatically and Accurately

Reading Conferences #4

In the fourth post of our Reading Conferences with Beginning Readers blog series, renowned literacy expert Jennifer Serravallo shares how to read sight words automatically and accurately. This post is taken from our free, downloadable “Success Starts Early: Reading Conferences with Your Beginning Readers” guide.

What are sight words and why are they important?

Sight words are words that children have learned to recognize without having to decode. Sight words are some of the most frequently used words in English and some of the first words early readers learn to recognize on sight and read. Level A, B, and C books are filled with these familiar words. When children read books at these levels, they should be able to recognize the words they have learned and read them automatically. Continue reading

How to Use Pictures to Help Students Read in Kindergarten

In the third post of our Reading Conferences with Beginning Readers blog series, renowned literacy expert Jennifer Serravallo shares how to use pictures to help children read text. This post is taken from our free, downloadable “Success Starts Early: Reading Conferences with Your Beginning Readers” guide.

Teaching valuable reading skills and behaviors is essential in the beginning of kindergarten. When children start to read and engage with texts at levels A, B, and C, they need to know different strategies to use when they come to a word they don’t know or have to figure out what’s happening in the story.

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Mini Shared Reading with Más Piñata

mini shared readingIn the second post of our new Más Piñata blog series, Dr. Barbara Flores introduces the benefits of Mini Shared Reading, a method that prepares children to become independent readers.

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Tips for Reading Poetry Aloud to Children

Since Poetry Month is in full swing, we asked some of our poets at Lee & Low Books  to provide tips for reading poetry to kids and students. Read suggestions from Pat Mora, author of Yum! ¡Mmmm! ¡Qué Rico! Americas’ SproutingsConfetti: Poems for Children (Confeti: Poemas para niños); and upcoming title  Bookjoy, Wordjoy, listen to the wisdom of Marilyn Singer, author of A Full Moon Is Rising and upcoming title Every Month Is a New Year, and find the passion with Guadalupe García McCall, author of Under the Mesquite, Summer of the Mariposas (El verano de las mariposas), Shame the Stars, and upcoming Fall title All the Stars Denied, when reading poetry to kids. Continue reading

Celebrate International Jazz Day with Viola Davis

For your next read aloud, how about adding in some lively rhythms of New Orleans jazz and an award-winning storyteller?

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Webinar: Using Multicultural Children’s Poetry to Inspire Poetry Appreciation

Does your National Poetry Month reflect our nation? Learn how to find and use multicultural and diverse poetry in your classroom!

Join Lee & Low Books for a free webinar with Share My Lesson’s 5th annual Ideas & Innovations Virtual Conference, March 14-16, 2017.

Get ready for inspiring an appreciation for verse and encouraging your students to write poetry themselves!

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Shame the Stars: Teaching Forgotten Narratives

Guest BloggerIn this guest post, educator and writer Tami Charles presents text-dependent questions and inquiry-based activities for students to practice close reading and critical thinking with the book Shame the Stars. Continue reading

Close Reading in High School: Ink and Ashes

Featured title: Ink and Ashes

Written by: Valynne Maetani

Synopsis

When Japanese American Claire Takata finds out that her deceased father was once a member of the yakuza, a Japanese crime syndicate, danger enters her life that could end up killing someone. Winner of Tu Books’ New Visions Award, Ink and Ashes is a fascinating debut novel packed with romance, intrigue, and heart-stopping action.

Themes: trust, honesty, honor, family, teamwork, forgiveness Continue reading

The Importance of Text Selection: How to Incorporate Social Justice in an English Classroom

Guest BloggerWe at LEE & LOW BOOKS are excited to share the engaging, culturally relevant work happening in the high school classroom of Jarred Amato, veteran educator in Metro Nashville Public Schools. In his essay, Jarred describes the importance of text selection and how to incorporate social justice and relevant content into the English curriculum at the start of the school year. Originally posted at Jarred’s blog, A Look Inside Mr. Amato’s Classroom, this essay is reposted with permission. 

Confession: In eight years of teaching, I have never assigned work from a textbook. I don’t believe in test-prep passages or outdated texts that I know my students will struggle to relate to, connect with, or enjoy, either. My experience is that they generally do more harm than good.

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Building Classroom Community in Second Grade

Check out LEE & LOW BOOKS’ Building Classroom Community Unit for Second Grade! The FREE and downloadable unit consists of eight read aloud lesson plans to inspire your best classroom community yet. Continue reading