Category Archives: Guest Blogger Post

Authors, illustrators, educators, and other industry professionals visit the blog to share their expertise.

Judging Books by Their Covers

Today we are pleased to share this guest post from LGuest Bloggeribrarian and Diversity Coordinator Laura Reiko Simeon on the power of book covers.

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Black History Month Spotlight: William “Doc” Key

As February comes to an end, we round out Black History Month with a spotlight on William “Doc” Key, a self-taught veterinarian who taught his horse Jim Key how to read, write, and calculate math problems. Teaching a horse these skills might sound preposterous, but Doc was able to nurture Jim’s ability through kindness, patience, and empathy. Together they traveled throughout the United States and impressed audiences with Jim’s amazing performances. In the process, they broke racial barriers and raised awareness for the humane treatment of animals.

Here’s what Donna Janell Bowman, author of Step Right Up: How Doc and Jim Key Taught the World About Kindness, had to say about William “Doc” Key’s legacy and the amazing duo’s story:

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Valentine’s Day Children’s Books that Celebrate Familial Love

In this guest post, writer Rebecca En-Szu Hu-Van Wright compiles a list of 9 books to read with your loved ones for Valentine’s Day.

With Valentine’s Day right around the corner, there’s going to be a lot of talk about love…and there’s no better time to remember that family is often the first place children learn about love. Whether it is with a grandparent, a sibling, or an adopted parent, each relationship is special in its own way. To pay tribute to all the wonderful, different kinds of familial love, we’ve put together a book list of titles that celebrate and explore these unique bonds.

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Readers’ Reactions to Vivien Thomas’s Legacy

Guest BloggerAt LEE & LOW BOOKS, we know the power of a good story. Our books encourage readers to pursue their dreams, seek out information on people and cultures that are different from our own, and inspire change for the better. In this guest post, Gwendolyn Hooks, author of Tiny Stitches: The Life of Medical Pioneer Vivien Thomas, shares some heartwarming readers’ reactions to her book. 

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How to Make Your Book Fair Multicultural and Diverse

Guest BloggerWe at Lee & Low Books are often asked how schools and parent-teacher organizations can bring more diverse books to families and students through book fairs. We recently observed a wonderful illustration of a school community actively organizing a culturally responsive, diverse book fair. Today, Maria Falgoust, the librarian at the International School of Brooklyn, a Nursery–8th grade independent school in Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, NY, shares with us how her school organizes a book fair to promote diverse, inclusive books for families and students. Continue reading

Shame the Stars: Teaching Forgotten Narratives

Guest BloggerIn this guest post, educator and writer Tami Charles presents text-dependent questions and inquiry-based activities for students to practice close reading and critical thinking with the book Shame the Stars. Continue reading

The Importance of Text Selection: How to Incorporate Social Justice in an English Classroom

Guest BloggerWe at LEE & LOW BOOKS are excited to share the engaging, culturally relevant work happening in the high school classroom of Jarred Amato, veteran educator in Metro Nashville Public Schools. In his essay, Jarred describes the importance of text selection and how to incorporate social justice and relevant content into the English curriculum at the start of the school year. Originally posted at Jarred’s blog, A Look Inside Mr. Amato’s Classroom, this essay is reposted with permission. 

Confession: In eight years of teaching, I have never assigned work from a textbook. I don’t believe in test-prep passages or outdated texts that I know my students will struggle to relate to, connect with, or enjoy, either. My experience is that they generally do more harm than good.

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Guadalupe García McCall: The History That’s Not in Textbooks

This week, in acknowledgement of Columbus Day/Indigenous Guest BloggerPeoples’ Day, we are offering a series of blog posts that look at pieces of history that have been hidden, silenced, altered, or swept under the rug. Today we share author Guadalupe García McCall’s reflections on her discovery of a startling piece of Texas history. This piece was originally published as the Author’s Note in her new novel, Shame the Stars. Continue reading

The Power of Story: Rethinking How We Acknowledge Columbus Day

Next Monday is Columbus Day, but in recent years, there’s been a movement to abolish Columbus Day and replace it with Indigenous Peoples’ Day. Columbus Day occupies a dubious spot in our nation’s calendar, ostensibly commemorating both the “discovery” of the Americas by Christopher Columbus and the subsequent destruction and enslavement of countless indigenous people. Today we’re pleased to share this guest post from educator and writer Tami Charles on rethinking how we acknowledge Columbus Day. Continue reading

Banned Book Week Roundtable: The Evolution of Censorship

This week is Banned Book Week, a celebration of the freedom to read and an acknowledgement of the ongoing fight against censorship. There is much to talk about this year, including a fascinating survey by School Library Journal about librarian self-censorship and a PEN America report on challenged diverse children’s books, coupled with recent conversations sparked by author Lionel Shriver’s controversial comments about cultural appropriation and freedom of speech.

So, where are we when it comes to censorship? We asked authors, scholars, teachers, and librarians to share their thoughts with us in today’s roundtable. Participants: Continue reading