Book List: 7 Children’s Books for National Bullying Prevention Month

7 books about bullying

October is National Bullying Prevention Month, a movement meant to “unite communities around the world to educate and raise awareness of bullying prevention.” In this blog post, we gathered titles from our Bullying/Anti-Bullying Collection that feature stories about different experiences with bullying and peer pressure and how to overcome and accept people’s differences. Use these books to start important discussions with children about bullying, including bully prevention, conflict resolution, and the skills needed to navigate these situations.

Sparkle Boy

Sparkle Boy
by Lesléa Newman, illus. by Maria Mola

Casey loves to play with his blocks, puzzles, and dump trucks, and he also loves things that shimmer, glitter, and sparkle. Casey’s older sister, Jessie, thinks this is weird until an encounter with teasing bullies helps her learn to accept and respect Casey for who he is.

Find the Teacher’s Guide here.
Purchase a copy here.

Chess Rumble

Chess Rumble
by G. Neri, illus. by Jesse Joshua Watson

Chess Rumble is a story in free verse about a troubled boy who learns to use his mind instead of his fists through the guidance of an unconventional mentor and the game of chess.

Find the Teacher’s Guide here.
Purchase a copy here.

King for a Day

King for a Day
by Rukhsana Khan, illus. by Christiane Krömer

This lively, contemporary story introduces readers to the annual spring kite-flying festival of Basant, and to a spirited, determined young boy who masters kite fighting while finding his own way to face and overcome life’s challenges.

Find the Teacher’s Guide here.
Purchase a copy here.

First Day in Grapes

First Day in Grapes
by L. King Perez, illus. by Robert Casilla

All year long Chico and his family move up and down the state of California picking fruits and vegetables. Every September they pick grapes and Chico starts at a new school again. When fourth-grade bullies confront Chico in the lunchroom, he responds wisely with strengths of his own. Readers of all backgrounds will relate to Chico’s bravery and the creative way he finds to resolve conflict.

Find the Teacher’s Guide here.
Purchase a copy here.

It Doesn't Have to Be This Way

It Doesn’t Have to be this Way/No tiene que ser así
by Luis Rodríguez, illus. by Daniel Galvez

It Doesn’t Have To Be This Way is a compelling tale of a young boy’s encounter with the world of gangs—a world that author Luis J. Rodríguez knows firsthand. There is no easy answer to Monchi’s dilemma, but the love and respect of his uncle help him find a way out.

Find the Teacher’s Guide here.
Purchase a copy here.

Heroes

Heroes
by Ken Mochizuki, illus. by Dom Lee

Set against the backdrop of the 1960s, this intergenerational story explores how one family deals with the painful legacy of war and prejudice.

Find the Teacher’s Guide here.
Purchase a copy here.

Lend a Hand

Lend a Hand: Poems About Giving
by John Frank, illus. by London Ladd

A collection of original poems centered on giving and spontaneous acts of kindness, Lend a Hand demonstrates that empathy and social awareness can start at an early age.

Find the Teacher’s Guide here.
Purchase a copy here.

Purchase the anti-bullying collection:

Bullying Collection

Further Reading:
Books for Children and Educators About Kindness
Teaching Tolerance and Anti-Bullying
This Week in Diversity: Bullies, Surfer-Girls, and Ancient Diversity

3 thoughts on “Book List: 7 Children’s Books for National Bullying Prevention Month”

  1. I really love this article for the message of awareness for Bullying Prevention! I am doing a book giveaway every week on my social media for the same purpose. I hope to increase conversations in classrooms and homes about ways to prevent and stand up against bullying.
    However, I would love to see more gender equality in lists like these. Your loyal readers, like myself, depend on and look forward to recommendations from Lee and Low. The children’s literature world is heavily in favor of boy protagonists and anamorphic characters in picture books, MG, and YA books. I do see Marisol McDonald is represented in your graphic who we love (biracial girl power!!;)). I truly hope to see more girls represented in your lists in the future.

    1. Hi Bethany,
      Thank you so much for your thoughtful comment! This is something we definitely need to do better on. We will take your feedback to heart and work on more gender diversity in our lists going forward!

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