Black History Month Giveaway 2011

It’s Black History Month, and that means another giveaway from Lee & Low Books! We’re giving away three sets of three books featuring African Americans, and the contest will run through February 28, 2011.

But wait. Doesn’t that mean that the winners won’t get their books until after Black History Month?

Yes! We think Black History Month is important, but black history is part of American History, and shouldn’t get relegated to one month out of the year. So enter below to win three great books to read all year round!

Here’s how it works:

  • You must enter the contest by midnight, February 28th, 2011. There are five ways to enter:
    • Tweet/ReTweet about the contest on Twitter (make sure you include @LEEandLOW).
    • Comment on this post, telling us your favorite Black History reads or how you’d use the books below.
    • ‘Like’ the Lee & Low page on Facebook (let us know in the comments)
    • Subscribe to this blog (let us know in the comments). If you’re already subscribed, just post a comment telling us.
    • Post about the contest on your own blog (if you’re not hosted by WordPress, make sure you tell us in comments).

You get one entry per action – do all of the above and you’ll have five chances to win! At the end of February we’ll randomly select three winners, so be sure to leave us with a way to contact you.

Here are some of the books you could win:

Sweet Music in Harlem Knockin' On Wood Seven Miles to Freedom Zora Hurston and the Chinaberry Tree I and I Bob Marley The Last Black King of the Kentucky Derby

Good luck!

Side note: our comments are moderated, so don’t worry if yours doesn’t appear immediately.

59 thoughts on “Black History Month Giveaway 2011”

  1. Pingback: Shoes Dock Blog
  2. Great giveaways and I’m glad to receive notification per your blog, which I receive. I’d take the books with me when I substitute teach for those teachable moments.

  3. I liked Lee and Low on Facebook! I am subscribing to the blog too!! This is a great contest idea and I love reading black history books all year long, especially anything dealing with the Harlem Renaissance.

  4. I Tweeted the contest, will post the contest on my blog, honeysmoke.com, which is dedicated to raising biracial and multiracial children. If I were to win, I’d use the books to teach my daughters about black history every month of the year. I’d also review the books on my blog.

  5. I plan to use these books, especially Zora Hurston and the Chinaberry Tree, for an African American author study with upper elementary students.

  6. It’s great to see that publishers have not forgotten about Black history Month. A giveaway is always a good way to reach a larger audience and make more people aware of the great books that are out there.

  7. We have several favorite Black History reads such as Henry’s Freedom Box and Goin’ Someplace Special but we need more. I am the new (and first) librarian at a Title 1 school in Texas and we have no allocated library budget! I would use these books to help build our inventory and to meet the needs of our largely African American student population.

  8. I would love some books to talk to my 5 year old about her black roots. We’ve been focusing too much on her Vietnamese half and I can’t forget about her black culture as well.

  9. As a classroom teacher I would like to add these books to my classroom collection. I would use them as teaching tools as most of my students have never heard black music or heard of black musicians and singers of eras gone by. They are missing alot.

  10. Hi there,
    Thanks for this opportunity. I LOVE Lee and Low Books, and would be ecstatic about winning this important set of Black History Books. As a picture book reviewer, I have a growing audience that depends on me to tell them about the great books out there – especially multicultural books, which aren’t always easy to find. Thanks for all you do to include diversity in your picture books. We love you!

    Rita Lorraine

  11. I enjoyed Mama’s Windows. The characters were unique and very real. The motivation was strong and powerful. Both ‘Mama’s’ son and brother sustained her vision after her death in spite of obstacles created by the very church that was the driving force behind ‘Mama’s’ dream to have stained glass windows for the new church.

  12. If this is open to overseas readers please count me in.

    My knowledge of Black History is sketchy to say the least so I would like to read a bit more on the subject.

    mystica123athotmaildotcom

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